Posts

Showing posts from August, 2017

أقسام هامة

How to be Genius in 10 Steps

Image
Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid


Everyone wants to be genius, in one field at least, and thinks that genius is a talent; that is right to some extent, but if it is extremely true, genius will be owned by very few people, but genius is a plan you should follow to have it. Read these 10 steps based on Einstein's quotes to acquire genius someday.
1 - Perseverance and Determination
Einstein says "the idea isn't that I'm genius, but that I have much time in solving problems" Einstein then thinks that genius is 1% talent, 99% work, and perseverance, and there is no genius innately, but there are diligent who want to achieve what they are believing on to them and to others around them. And remember if you want to find a chance, find it among difficulties.
2 – Follow your Curiosity
Genius has no private talent, but a great love of knowledge. Seek knowledge whenever it was; ju…

Two Dramatic Scenes inside a Coffin of Pine Tree

Image
Two Dramatic Scenes inside a Coffin of Pine Tree


An entomologist who is fond of wood-boring insects introduces to us a short film that is worth a billion dollars. In that film which he recorded inside an old coffin of a pine tree we’ll see two wonderful theatrical and dramatically scenes.



The first scene of a wood boring insect in a trunk of a pine tree, which is a very hard kind of wood. This insect will drill, as we’ll see in the video, a hole in that tough wood. Of course no one can believe it would bore a hole in the wood. You got to know it has got an amazing organ just like a drill, which it used to drill a hole in that wood! Though it is an organ of living creature, it is harder than steel. This organ works just like a driller, and you’ll see the sawdust generated by drilling the hole about one-inch hole till it reaches to the pith and drills a hole in it too, in which it will lay eggs. Afterwards, these eggs will produce larvae that for two years would keep growing to become quit…

Learn English from Short Stories (Our New Telephone)

Image
Learn English from Short Stories (Our New Telephone)


“I’ve been thinking, Clinton,” my mother said one evening as she and my father sat reading, “that almost everybody else has a telephone now. We ought to have one, too.” “Not in this house. I don’t want one of those gadgets here,” declared my father as he put down his pipe. “Why, Clinton?” asked my mother. “What’s the matter with having a telephone?” My father sat still for a moment and then gave a loud sneeze. “Get out of here!” he demanded, blowing his nose. “You know cat fur always gives me nose trouble. I hate cats. They do nothing but spread germs around.” “Punk is a clean cat, Clinton, and he doesn't have any germs,” replied my mother. “And please try not to be against a telephone,”



Father Says No
“I’m not against it,” said my father, “so long we don’t have one here.” “But, Clinton,” my mother continued, “Ruth’s growing up, you know, and all the other girls have telephone. It isn’t as if we wanted to make a lot of calls to cost us …

History as Tree Rings Tell It

Image
History as Tree Rings Tell It


This is a true story of an astronomer who learned more about the sun by looking around him than by looking up into the sky. As a result, he established a new science. The name of the science is dendrochronology. It deals with growth-rings of trees. The rings offer clear records of the weather of the past and give us new information on human history.


Growth Patterns
A tree grows well in favorable years and slowly in years of drought or other hardship. The change from good years to bad years leaves a pattern of rings in a cross section of the tree trunk. For instance, three good years followed by three years of drought form three widely separated rings which are close together. The date of a serious drought can be determined by counting from the present year’s ring of a growing tree. Suppose a drought was 50 years ago. The we find its mark by counting the rings in from the bark. There will be 50 rings before we reach the closely packed rings. An old timber we find…

Learn English From Short Stories (Joe Dixon and His Writing Stick)

Image
Learn English From Short Stories (Joe Dixon and His Writing Stick)


It took the civil war and 50 years of struggle by a determined man to show the American people that the pencil was here to stay.
In the early part of the 19th century, few Americans wrote with pencils. The only pencils available came from Europe and were not of good quality. They cost 25 cents each – at a time when that amount of money would buy a basketful of food. The first American who saw the need for a good, inexpensive pencil was a 13-year-old boy in Marblehead. Massachusetts – Joe Dixon. His search for a way to fill this need occupied a great deal of his time and his thinking in the years that followed. Before he succeeded, he became an inventor of considerable importance. Joe Dixon’s interest in pencils began with graphite – the soft, black substance used in making the “lead” for pencils. U.S. sailing ships trading in the Far East needed ballast on their return trips. Graphite, mined in Ceylon, made good ballast be…

Learn English From Short Stories (Land of No Tomorrows)

Image
Learn English From Short Stories (Land of No Tomorrows)


The old, gray-haired trapper seated opposite me was called slim. “I’m not lying when I say it gets cold here,” he remarked. “In my cabin once it was 70 below, so I wanted to start a fire and heat the cabin fast. I put a match to some gasoline, but it wouldn’t burn. It was too cold. So I started a fire with wood on top of the gasoline. After a minute or two it burned fine. That’s a fact.” An Unusual Place “A lot of strange things happen,” said Hank, a friend of slim’s. “The natives farther north call this the Land of No Tomorrows. After you’ve been here a while you’ll understand why.” We were sitting in the hotel at Yellowknife. It is a small town in the Northwest Territories of Canada, 250 miles south of the Arctic Circle, near the heart of one of the most interesting regions in the world. Gold seekers were gathered in small groups about me, discussing claims believed to be rich in the precious metal. Trappers in worn moose hide coats …

روابط هامة

مواضيع ذات صلة